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100 Pages A Day...Stephanie's Book Reviews

I absolutely love historical fiction and read a lot of it; I love to learn history this way.  I also enjoy reading science fiction, fantasy, horror, thriller and non-fiction science.

She Wears the Mask

She Wears the Mask - Shelly Stratton

Angelique Bixby is braving the streets of 1950's Chicago.  After her husband Daniel's death Angelique has had trouble supporting herself and newborn, Ella Jean.  Living on Chicago's South Side as a white woman married to a black man has not been easy.  Feeling she has no other choice, Angelique leaves her child with a respected family and tries to move on with life.  Years later, Angelique has remarried into a family of privilege.  She has been recently diagnosed with breast cancer and wants to amend her  will to include the daughter she left behind.  Angelique hires Jasmine Stanley, an ambitious, rising star at her law firm.  Jasmine's has been asked to keep strict confidentiality with Angelique's task.  At first, Jasmine believes that Angelique is another stuck up debutante, however as she digs into Angelique's past, she realizes that they are more alike than they seem; both women hold onto life altering secrets.

She Wears the Mask is a story about secrets, identity and family.  The characters were well developed and I could feel the heartbreak as Angelique made the most difficult decision of her life as well as the emotional weight of the secret Jasmine carried.  The writing skillfully worked across dual timelines divulging bits of Angelique's history as we learn about her present circumstance as well as unraveling the history of pain in Jasmine's family without giving everything away early on. I do wish we got to see a little more of Angelique's story at the end. Along with the themes of reconciling the past are themes of  gender, race and the perceptions and weight that the color of your skin can carry.  Overall, She Wears the Mask is an intense and absorbing plot and interesting characters.


This book was received for free in return for an honest review. 

Folly At The Fair

Folly At The Fair - Kari Bovee Annie Oakley is on tour at the Chicago World's Fair along with her manager and husband Frank. Annie is tired out from a grueling tour schedule as well as suffering from an earlier miscariage. Just when Annie is starting to feel like things are getting back on track, a friend from childhood leaves her young daughter, Lizzie with Annie with no explanation. At the same time, a body is found at the fairgrounds and one of Annie's fellow performers is accused of murder for defending her from a enraged man. Annie is determined to help her friend prove his innocence as well as help Lizzie reunite with her mother all while continuing to perform flawlessly at Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Transporting me back to the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, Folly at the Fair is a multi-layered mystery featuring real life heroine, Annie Oakley. While Annie may not have actually been a detective, her character attributes of being a dedicated, hard working, and honest friend make her easily believable in this role. I did love the descriptions of Annie's performances in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show along with many of the other acts that were all recreated from history. The mystery was fast-paced and kept the suspense and tension high. While I had a good idea of who the culprit was from early on, the writing kept me on my toes with two possible suspects. With a heart-pounding ending, this mystery entertains from beginning to end. This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

Balthazar's Bane (Gaslamp Gothic #6)

Balthazar's Bane - Kat Ross

Balthazar, an ageless former necromancer is on a quest to rid the world of the evil necromancers that remain. His latest bounty brings him to Egypt where he quickly dispatches John Mortlake. However, the easy kill comes with strings attached. John Mortlake has debts with the djinn and a daughter who absolutely refuses to pay the debts for a father she equally despised. Balthazar gets waylaid after Mortlakes death by a beautiful woman and ends up on a Nile cruise. Balthazar's wiles get the best of him though, as the woman he is chasing steals the talisman that has kept him alive for over 2000 years. In trying to retrieve his talisman, Balthazar gets tied up in the woman's troubles and finds himself imprisoned by the djinn in a magical desert kingdom and now must retrieve a sword from a demon in order to escape with his life and his talisman.

 

Enchanting, fun and action packed, Balthazar's Bane continues the world of the Gaslamp Gothic series. I really enjoyed getting to know Bathazar and Lucas better. The writing dives into some of Balthazar's lengthy past and his history with Lucas without slowing things down. I was in a love/hate relationship with Zarifa's character based on her changing actions. She was strong, independent and free thinking, mostly one step ahead of the guys. Most of all, I loved being transported to the magical city of Al Miraj and exploring the many inhabitants of the city along with their dwellings and items. The trails that the demon led had me enthralled as Balthazar deftly fought his way through. Thoughtfully weaving in themes of growth, good vs. evil and respect for all living things, Balthazar's Bane entertained from beginning to end and I can't wait to see what these characters get into next. This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

Tribulation

Tribulation - Jaydeep Shah

Six yaears ago partners Alex and Casie hatched a cruel plan to murder Ana, a young accountant, for her father's holdings. Now, Casie receives a strange phone call that forces her to return to the mansion where it all happened.  As Casie and Alex celebrate their eleventh wedding anniversary they experience a series of strange events.  At the center of the events is a woman they expected to never see again.  Ana has returned to make Casie and Alex pay for her tribulations.


Diving right into the action, Tribulations was a heart pounding read from the very beginning.  There has been a murder, but we don't know of who or the reasons surrounding it.  Casie and Alex are an interesting couple, power hungry, driven, sadists with absolutely no scruples.  Ana is painted as their exact opposite, caring, polite and moral.  Combining these characters makes for an intriguing, disastrous and fast-paced trial of pain and punishment.  There was a sense of something paranormal throughout the story, but it never quite manifests.  There would definitely be another layer of excitement for me as well as some more explanation of motives if this element is incorporated.  As the story moves, an element of mystery is brought in with a separate game that law enforcement might be playing.  Ending on a cliffhanger, I'll definitely have to find out what happens to this group moving forward.

This book was received for free in return for an honest review. 

The Places We Sleep

The Places We Sleep - Caroline Brooks DuBois Twelve year old Abbey is starting the school year at a new school once again. This time she is in Tennessee and her school is farther from her father's Army base than usual. Abbey has also managed to make a friend in happy and athletic Camille. She might even make friends with the artistic and cool Jiman. Then, September 11, 2001 comes. Abbey wakes up with her first menstrual cycle along with the news that will change her life forever. Once the news hits, Abbey's mother rushes to New York, her sister Rebecca is missing. Abbey is left with her father, her new body and a new world to navigate. As time passes, Abbey's father is deployed, and kids change their opinion about her at school, all the while her body keeps on schedule, slowly marking the months. Uniquely written in narrative verse, The Places We Sleep beautifully captures the thoughts of a preteen experiencing the trauma of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The writing immediately took me back to that day that connected so many of us across the country in fear. Just like Abbey, the day has been cemented in my mind. The verse perfectly captures the raw emotion at the time paralleled with coming of age. Through Abbey's eyes there is a deep look at the grief, depression and confusion that defined the months following the attacks. Between Abbey's Aunt, parents, and classmates there is a wide cross section of representation of how people reacted and were effected by many aspects of 9/11. Abbey shows that while an event may seem defining, the support of friendship and love can help you through. This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

The Black Kids

The Black Kids - Christina Hammonds Reed

Ashley Bennett has lived a luxurious life in an upper class Los Angeles neighborhood.  However, as the school year winds down and a local man, Rodney King is murdered, Ashley is forced to reevaluate how she views herself and her peers. At first, Ashley the Rodney King murder is barely a blip on Ashley's radar, although after the verdict is delivered and the protests and riots begin, Ashley begins to see a difference in the way she and her family are treated.  She is not just any girl at her high school, she is one of the black kids. 

The Black Kids is so on point and perfectly written that I want everyone to read this book immediately.  Honest, poignant, and driven, the writing had me hooked from the beginning; it was eerie how the events of the very first chapter seemed to perfectly echo the current events of the USA.  I liked that Ashley's character was not the typical 'black kid' of the time and had to experience the consequences of the Rodney King murder to realize the truth of how her race effects her daily life.  Through Ashley's eyes I experienced the blatant racism and sexism that was as rampant in 1992 as it is now.  The prose also perfectly captured the wonders of being a teen along with the nostalgia of the early 1990's.  Ashley's journey  had great revelations about racism and the weight of representing her race in a white world, as well as understanding of poverty, friendship and growing up.  The consequences of the Rodney King verdict and the subsequent riots were a turning point in Ashley's view of herself and her life, opening up her eyes and my own to see just how long people of color have been vigilantly fighting against systemic racism in the USA and highlighting the cycle of racism, unjust killing, protest and unrest until we put a bandage on the current issue until we forget about what caused the previous issue.  The Black Kids is a must-read for everyone who wants to better understand the world we live in.

This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

The Takeaway Men

The Takeaway Men: A Novel - Meryl Ain

Aron and Edyta Lubinski have survived the horrors of Poland during World War II. Edyta risked her life to relocate children and then hid Aron away in her attic. After the War, Aron and Edyta don't feel comfortable in Poland and find their way to a Displaced Persons Camp where Edyta converts to Judaism and gives birth to twin girls, Bronka and Johanna. Aron and Edyta find a way to the United States where they live with Aron's relatives, Izzy and Faye. Once in America Aron delves deeper into his religion and attempts to forget about the horrors of his past, never talking about his story. Dyta strives to be the best Jewish wife she can be while Johanna and Bronka find their place in American culture. The girls grow up knowing they are Jewish, but without any knowledge of their parent's past. As Communism stretches into their neighborhood, the family witnesses a Jewish neighbor being arrested for ties to Communism and Aron is immediately reminded of his time in Poland. His fear transfers to his daughter Bronka who yearns for the full story while Johanna takes a more carefree approach to life. When the truth of their parent's past comes through, Bronka and Johanna are shocked while Aron and Edyta must finally come forth with the secrets of their family. The Takeaway Men is an insightful and heartfelt look into the experiences of Jewish immigrants after World War II. Aron and Dyta's experience was unique, although no less harrowing than many of their Jewish neighbors in New York. It was interesting to see the different approaches to dealing with the trauma that each family experienced during the War from constantly telling everyone they meet their experiences, to trying to enact revenge, and trying to hide their experiences from everyone. The effects of Aron's fear and shame was apparent through Bronka's panic attacks and showed just how lasting trauma can be. It was really thought provoking to see the similarities drawn between the arrests for Communism in America and for being Jewish in Europe. The story was told from the third person point of view in order to incorporate everyone's very different experiences; however, through this lens, I didn't feel like I connected with anyone. At the end, I was happy that the truth had come out, but I did wish that I could see the effects of this on the twins. This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

NIght Owls and Summer Skies

Night Owls and Summer Skies - Rebecca Sullivan

The summer before Emma Lane's eighteenth birthday is the last summer she will have to return to York Beach, Maine for the court ordered two months of visitation with her mother.  Since Emma came out as gay at the age of twelve, her mother has been unaccepting of her sexuality, distant and divorced her father.  Now, Emma returns to York Beach only to be dumped at Camp Maplewood where she suffered a traumatic episode several years before throwing Emma into a depression complete with PTSD while her mother jet sets around the world with her new husband.  Emma immediately sets out to get herself thrown out of camp by breaking into the shed holding the camper's phones only to be thwarted at every attempt by counselor Vivian Black. As Emma deals with her worst fears at camp, she makes a friend in chipper, outgoing Gwen Black and a passion for cooking with Julie Black, the camp cook. Each time Emma even thinks about doing something to get herself kicked out, Vivian seems to be a step ahead, helping Emma through her fears and getting to know her well, maybe even more.

Night Owls and Summer Skies is a perfect summer romance.  I loved that Emma's character was already secure in her sexuality and that finding her sexuality was not the main point of the book, this was simply a romance.  Emma's character also had deeper issues such as her depression and PTSD which still affect her, but don't define her.  The writing brought me into Emma's head and at times I felt like I was having a panic attack along with her.  Emma's growth at camp was amazing to read through.  From dealing with bullies, making friends, finding a hobby she enjoys and learning how to trust again along with slowly recovering from her trauma from years before.  Emma and Vivian's relationship felt natural and unhurried as they simply fell into one another.  I did find it a little weird that they were counselor and camper, although they were only one year apart in age.  I do wish there was some growth for Emma's mother along with some of the other campers; however, it is Emma's story.  Overall, a fun summer romance.

This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

The Peasant's Dream (Hagenheim #11)

The Peasant's Dream - Melanie Dickerson

Adela, the youngest daughter of the Duke of Hagenheim longs for adventure and true love, just like her older siblings have found before her. When Adela hears that yet another suitor, the son of the Duke of Grundelsbach, Lord Barthold will be calling on her she decides to leave the castle unguarded and dressed as a peasant. While at the market, she meets Frederick. Frederick is a peasant who works tirelessly on his father's farm where his drunken father often beats Frederick and his mother. In his free time Frederick hones his wood carving skills and has found a job carving for the bishop of Hagenheim. Adela and Frederick ease into one another's company as they talk of art and their families. However, Frederick doesn't know of Adela's true identity and when some boys from the countryside hatch a plan to kidnap the Duke's daughter for some extra money, Frederick becomes caught up in their plan and his future as well as his relationship with Adela are compromised.


The Peasant's Dream is the eleventh book in the Hagenheim series. While reading the previous books will help fill in some details, it is not necessary to read them all in order to enjoy The Peasant's Dream. In this reversal retelling of Cinderella, Adela and Frederick are able to find love on their own and form a deeper and meaningful bond than simply meeting at a ball. There were enough elements from the Cinderella story to make it recognizable, but also plenty of new twists to add excitement and suspense. Adela and Frederick's character's both had depth and interesting backstories. I really enjoyed that they were able to bond over art and tales of their family even though they were from such different backgrounds. The suspense and excitement was kept heightened as the plan to capture Adela goes awry, Barthold's jealousy takes over and Lord Conrat begins to meddle further. One thing I didn't particularly enjoy was the addition of the overly religious themes. I understood its place in Frederick's wood carvings, but it seemed overbearing at points. Overall, The Peasant's Dream is a fast-paced, enjoyable fairy tale retelling and a pleasant addition to the world of Hagenheim.


This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

Once in a Blood Moon

Once In A Blood Moon - Dorothea Hubble Bonneau
Alexandra de Gambia has lived a dual life on Heaven Hill plantation.  Her mother is concerned about social appearances and keeping up with the white world that she desperately wants to stay a part of.  Her father lives a traditional farming life among other free blacks on Heaven Hill's grounds providing a healthy profit for his family.  However, many people are not happy about the de Gambia's household, they believe that a black family should not hold land and will do anything in order to push them off their land.  When it finally happens, Alexandra's father is prepared to protect her and her brother, Jimmy as the heirs to Heaven Hill.  Things quickly turn sour as Jimmy and Alexandra are captured.  Alexandra is sold to a master and hidden away in a tower.  The tower is filled with the music of the master's son who dreams of being a composer.  Alexandra commits the score to memory and impresses the master's son, Peter with her knowledge and talent. 
 
Set in the early 1800's before the Underground Railroad, Once in a Blood Moon presents an intriguing historical fiction about the very unique situation of Alexandra de Gambia.  Alexandra's family are black land owners and slaveholders in South Carolina that descended from a group of slaves that joined with the indigenous Cofitachiqui people who rebelled and freed themselves.  Alexandra's character was caught between two worlds, but only wants to do what is right for her family.  I was fascinated by the very different lives that her mother and father led as well as her willingness to please both.  While Alexandra might not be a real person, the story of her ancestors is true and was amazing to learn about. I was equally absorbed in the fact that there were freemen that were slave owners as well.  Alexandra's story quickly becomes perilous and absorbing as everything falls out from under her and her life changes in an instant.  I was captivated by Alexandra's journey as a captured slave.  I knew of the dangers, but still found it hard to read at many points.  Alexandra's friend, the indentured servant, John Fowler also captured my attention and I was pleasantly surprised to see that John Fowler was a real person and an ancestor of the author.  With an amazing ending, Once in a Blood Moon is an amazing story of an even more amazing group of people. 
 
This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

Mythical Girls

Mythical Girls  - Alex McGilvery Mythical Girls is a short story collection that focuses around what happens when girls are given control of mythical objects. With eleven stories total, there is a good variety of stories, objects, and characters. With any anthology, there were stories that I liked more than others and some that I disliked. Luckily, I really enjoyed most of the stories in this anthology. The book started out strong with Daybreak where Queen Rajakumari takes leadership of a kingdom after the King dies. The writing quickly sets the scene and allowed me to get to know Queen Rajakumari and what she was up against. I loved how she didn't take crap and used the other Queens as allies instead of enemies. This was definitely a story that I wanted to stay in longer. Another story I enjoyed was An Unexpected Weapon. I have read other stories by this author and with the same characters that are in this short, so I really enjoyed being with the characters again and seeing them gain confidence in a new situation. The Witch's Staff is also a story I enjoyed, incorporating fun otherworldly characters and a great message about bullying and forgiveness in two different worlds. The Rishika of the Manika was another great story. I really enjoyed the fantasy elements and the mythical object. The lessons in power, leadership and getting what you wish for are very strong. Most of the stories are aimed at Middle Grade readers, however some seem more appropriate for young adult or even new adult readers. I love the idea of giving girls the power of all of these mythical objects that are generally controlled by by men and seeing the choices that they make. This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

Mythical Girls

Mythical Girls  - Alex McGilvery Mythical Girls is a short story collection that focuses around what happens when girls are given control of mythical objects. With eleven stories total, there is a good variety of stories, objects, and characters. With any anthology, there were stories that I liked more than others and some that I disliked. Luckily, I really enjoyed most of the stories in this anthology. The book started out strong with Daybreak where Queen Rajakumari takes leadership of a kingdom after the King dies. The writing quickly sets the scene and allowed me to get to know Queen Rajakumari and what she was up against. I loved how she didn't take crap and used the other Queens as allies instead of enemies. This was definitely a story that I wanted to stay in longer. Another story I enjoyed was An Unexpected Weapon. I have read other stories by this author and with the same characters that are in this short, so I really enjoyed being with the characters again and seeing them gain confidence in a new situation. The Witch's Staff is also a story I enjoyed, incorporating fun otherworldly characters and a great message about bullying and forgiveness in two different worlds. The Rishika of the Manika was another great story. I really enjoyed the fantasy elements and the mythical object. The lessons in power, leadership and getting what you wish for are very strong. Most of the stories are aimed at Middle Grade readers, however some seem more appropriate for young adult or even new adult readers. I love the idea of giving girls the power of all of these mythical objects that are generally controlled by by men and seeing the choices that they make. This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

Rebel Spy

Rebel Spy - Veronica Rossi

Frannie Tasker spent her days diving for wrecks in the Grand Bahamas in 1776.  After her mother's death, Frannie is left with her step-father Sewal who abuses her and now wants to take her to be his wife.  Frannie takes an opportunity to escape with a shipwreck that she spots, and assumes the life of a woman aboard who drowned.  There were no survivors of the wreck and everyone believes that Frannie, now assuming the role of Emmaline Coates, is a miracle.  Frannie is swept away upon a British merchant ship on its way to her new home-and war in New York.  Frannie takes upon the task of learning to be a highborn lady who is soon to inherit sharing her secret only with Asa Lane, a rebel patriot being held on the ship.   Frannie plays her role well and three years later is fully accepted as Emmaline and is ready to be married off.  Her chosen suitor, British Lieutenant James Duncan sweeps her off her feet and talks a lot about his role.  Frannie soons finds a way to feel more like herself, as a spy for George Washington known as Agent 355, codename Lady.  

 
Agent 355 was a real spy for George Washington in the Culper Spy Ring known for helping with the arrest of Major John André.  While little is known of the real Agent 355, I absolutely adored Veronica Rossi's creation of Frannie.  From her time diving for wrecks in the Bahamas to her grand escape on the merchant ship, playing the part of Emmaline perfectly and her rediscovery of her sense of adventure by joining the Culper ring, Frannie had me amazed.  Frannie's life as both a wrecker and a lady of privilege creates a wide contrast as well as an additional layer of suspense of someone unmasking her carefully built disguise. As much as I loved the story of Frannie helping the rebels with her Spy ring, I further enjoyed the constant struggle within Frannie of becoming Emmaline and staying Frannie.  The romance between Frannie and Asa was sweet and added another layer of tension as she courted Duncan alongside rekindling her feelings for Asa.  Most of all, I enjoyed learning about the Culper Spy ring and their influence in the Revolutionary War.  Through her spying, Frannie finds her spirit, purpose and identity.  With an intriguing plot, in-depth characters and a heart-pounding ending, Rebel Spy amazingly recreates one of history's unknown women. 
 
This book was received for free in return for an honest review. 

The Woman in the Green Dress

The Woman in the Green Dress - Tea Cooper

Armistice Day should have been full of joy for Fleur Richards; however, her day turns to despair as she receives a letter that her husband Hugh has become a casualty of war.  With the notice, Fleur also discovers that she has been named next of kin for Hugh's inheritance in Australia.  Now, Fleur ventures to Australia alone and must unravel the mystery of her husband's estate. 

 

Sixty-six years earlier Della Atterton lives a quiet life practicing her craft of taxidermy on the remote Mogo Creek in New South Wales until Captain Stefan von Richter comes crashing into her life.  Stefan is tracking down what he believes to be Australia's first opal.  The quest for the opal will bring both fortune and turmoil into his life as well as the life of his family.

 

Told from dual timelines, this haunting mystery pulled me into the wonders of Australia.  The story did take me a little time to get into as I figured out how the two storylines were connected.  I was more drawn towards Fleur's story and her daring, courageous and caring nature.  Her strength shone as she set out across the world alone to learn about Hugh.  Fleur's drive to figure out Hugh's origins and the mystery of the Curio Shop she inherited were fueled with passion.  In the earlier timeline, Della's character echoed Fleur's sentiments; however, I was drawn into Stefan and Bert's quest and relationship even more.    Cordelia's character heightened the mystery as I tried to figure out her angle and motivations.  Most of all, I enjoyed the descriptions of Australia.  I was surprised at the dark history of the rampant attacks and racism on the native people of Australia; however, it is always good to learn about. The ending expertly wrapped  the two timelines together and satisfied the mystery.  
This book was received for free in return for an honest review. 

Skudakumooch

Skudakumooch - Russ Meidinger
Cory and Greg have been best friends since high school despite being completely different people.  Now, in their fifties, the men's lives have taken very different paths. However, they still meet up for their annual hunting trip in the Canadian Rockies.  While on their trip, Cory and Greg follow a large monarch Elk into the Tochquinlan Range, a sacred but uninhabited area of the First Nations People.  Cory's grandfather told him stories of his ancestors and the Shaman who turned to evil and is believed to now be a Skudakumooch, a ghost which.  After Cory and Greg enter the Tochquinlan range, their luck turns sour.  They are hunted by a grizzly with haunting grey eyes and the Elk leads them into the hoodoos. Cory seems to be obsessed with finding the Elk at all costs.  As the Elk leads the pair into a cave system, they will learn exactly what that cost is. 
 
Skudakumooch, the ghost witch.  The title alone was enough to pull me in.  I loved that this is based on Native American folklore and it led me to look into more Native stories of the Skudakumooch.  The writing is a slow burn of suspense building as the two men travel into the woods.  As the Skudakumooch appeared in different ways, it wasn't always apparent what the Skudakumooch wanted from them.  The descriptions of the Tochquinlan Range, the hoodoos and the especially creepy cave added to the uneasy feeling of the story.  The men's relationship was another important part of the story that I enjoyed as Greg reminisced about their time growing up together and began to pinpoint the times people said strange things about Cory.  I did want a little more out of their friendship, but the connection was still good.  As the Skudakumooch grows in power and presence the grotesque and horror elements of the story come into full view as chaos erupts.  There was also an underlying theme of environmental preservation; however, I'm not sure that the Skudakumooch is the protector or the destroyer. 
 
This book was received for free in return for an honest review. 

Speakeasy: A Novella

Speakeasy: A Novella - A.M. Dunnewin
Eddie Durante is the owner of a speakeasy and a mobster under his Uncle, the boss of the Durante family.  Eddie is still recovering from the death of his wife, Kate who was killed by the rival Caprice family in a territory dispute. Amidst this, Eddie is notified that the Caprice's have a hit out on him within his own speakeasy.  As the bodies start piling up, Eddie realizes that this is more than a regular hit.  This is payback, revenge in the purest form imaginable for the decisions he made for his family.
 
Speakeasy is a fast-paced historical suspense novella set in the 1920's.  I was quickly brought into the glitz and mystery of Eddie's speakeasy as the writing describes the intrigue and glamour of the hidden speakeasy and the people who frequent it. Since this is a novella, there wasn't much about Eddie's background or character other than he cares a lot about his family and business, however this adds to the mystery of why Eddie is being so mercilessly hunted. The action and suspense ramped up quickly as everyone around Eddie began dying.  As Eddie begins to unravel the reasons behind this particularly merciless hit, I could sense who the mastermind behind Eddie's demise was in an amazing, vindictive and twisted ending.  

This book was received for free in return for an honest review.